More than just an employee survey

TINYpulse discovers how your employees are feeling, and performing

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Measure how happy, frustrated, or burnt-out your employees are, and gain real time employee feedback to create a company culture you can be proud of.
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Posts from Justin Reynolds

Tips for Giving Negative Feedback at a Happy Company

In our 2017 Employee Engagement Report, we discovered that the intangible aspects of the organization — like culture, interpersonal relationships, and work environment — are the top factors that correlate with employee happiness.

The Case for Building a Distributed Team

A lot of folks have the same misconception about remote workers: They’re lazy, unmotivated people who sleep the day away and, in the rare instances they actually do any work, they’re usually in their pajamas sitting on the couch giving less than their all.

5 Reasons Your Employee Engagement Stats Are Bad

Everybody knows how important engagement is to any organization. The more engaged your employees are, the more likely they will be happier and more productive.

How CEOs Can ‘Pre-Suade’ Employees to Embrace Organizational Change

In 1984, psychologist Robert Cialdini released Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. Very simply, the book examines the psychology behind what makes people say “yes” to something — and how understanding those techniques can help marketers and other professionals achieve the outcomes they desire.

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Start-Up Report: Female-Led Start-Ups Are Growing Faster

A few weeks ago, TINYpulse released its 2017 Annual Start-Up Culture Report, a study that shines a light on a number of trends related to workplace culture in the fast-moving world of start-ups. We anonymously surveyed more than 100 founders — as well as thousands of their employees — to find out what ingredients are most strongly correlated with the growth and success of new companies.

Can Salary Transparency Close the Wage Gap?

For a long time, companies convinced their employees that they shouldn’t be able to discuss their salaries with their coworkers. If a worker made $70,000 and their colleague, who did the same job, was paid $60,000 even though they had the same experience and credentials, it wouldn’t end pretty if the lower-paid worker found out.