TINYpulse Tips: Asking a Custom Question

by B.J. Shannon on Sep 9, 2013 7:00:00 PM

Companies love that we handle all the planning, thinking, and delivery to gain insights, recognition, and suggestions from their staff. At the same time, these same companies encounter atypical situations like management change, company move, M&A, etc. and would like to ask a customized question that pertains to these situations. It can also allow you to address your company's culture specifically, as each company will have their own unique cultural idenity that may need unique questions to assess changes over time. 

To handle this, we've built in the flexibility to ask A Custom Question within the TINYpulse framework, which means that you can only ask one question just like a regular TINYpulse. To prepare a custom question, simply log-in to your dashboard during the week before your next TINYpulse question and hover over "Manage Pulses". Next, select "Create a Custom Question" from the drop-down menu.

Similar to a typical TINYpulse question, you'll then be given the option to select from one of the three following choices:

  • 1-10 Scale
  • Yes/No
  • Open-ended text

Click on your preferred format and fill in each text box to create your question.

While creating your custom question, you can view a preview at the bottom in real time as you update it. Once you are satisfied with your custom question, click save. If you ever change your mind about the custom question you created, you can click "Cancel Upcoming Custom Question" when you return to the "Create a Custom Question" page. 

As noted on the Ask Custom Question page:

  • There will be no benchmarks associated with custom questions since the question is specific to your organization.
  • We'll inform your users that it is a custom question when they view that week's TINYpulse
  • Users will still be able to enter Cheers for Peers and Virtual Suggestions


To refer to all of our TINYpulse Tips, click here and check out the full list of TINYpulse Tips.

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This post was written by B.J. Shannon