Top HR and Company Culture News – July 8, 2013

by B.J. Shannon on Jul 8, 2013 2:30:13 AM

interview6A job interview is a great opportunity to demonstrate that you are the most deserving candidate for a job by skillfully answering all of the questions asked of them. As much as a good answer can set one apart from the crowd, the questions asked BY the interviewee about the company is of crucial importance. "A job interview is a two-way street", writes Jacquelyn Smith of Forbes. She continues, "The employer asks questions to determine if the interviewee is an ideal fit for the job, and the smart candidate uses the interview to assess how she would fit in, if she would be able to do her best work there, and how well aligned her goals are with those of the employer." Some examples of good questions a candidate can ask during an interview are "What is the typical career trajectory for a person in this position?" and "Why do you like working here?".

spectrumEmployee happiness has become a priority for many companies interested in achieving a more productive and efficient staff. One ad agency in London is focusing on improving employee happiness in an effort to increase creativity among its team. Marissa Brassfield featured Havas Worldwide London in this recent article emphasizing the importance of "positive psychology" in a workplace. Brassfield writes that the agency has hired Neil Frude of The Happiness Consultancy to "train its employees to become happier as a means of boosting creativity." Frude is quoted in the article as saying, "There is a strong relationship between employee happiness and a workforce that is productive, creative, and flourishing."

angiehicks174x177As we all know, the centerpiece of a company is its culture. The goal of every company leader should be to establish and maintain a culture that attracts and retains staff. In The Huffington Post, Angie Hicks, the founder of Angie's List, listed three steps to creating a successful culture that allows a company to thrive. The first of the three steps is to "determine what you want to be, and make it clear to everyone." This crucial task includes deciding what your company's values and vision are and turning them into a set of simple guidelines for your entire team to follow. Some values that Hicks committed to at her company are "being honest, having fun and being creative."

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This post was written by B.J. Shannon